Tag Archives: diet

Are you DIETING?? Do you need someone to whom you can feel superior??

Rita Turner would be happy to volunteer. She probably holds the world’s record for being on a diet for the fewest minutes ever: one morning she was absolutely committed to a new diet when she got out of bed, and off it before she even hit the kitchen. In addition to swearing off sugars, fats and every food that’s white, she has even resolved to give up dieting from time to time…. This time, for example:

Rita leaves the three of them at the Emergency entrance to University Hospital. She takes the car home so she can change her clothes, clean the puke off the back seat of the car – as much as possible at least, considering that she can’t get the garage door open and it’s minus fifteen in the driveway and blowing snow – and do something about the mess on the living-room rug. While she’s at home, she takes the opportunity to run downstairs and grab a few Mars bars from a box at the back of the shelf in the guest-room closet. She eats one and puts two others in her purse, and immediately feels much better.

Rita has given up on giving up, at least for the time being . . . for three weeks, to be exact: until the first of January. She’s decided she’s been putting too much pressure on herself by going on so many diets all the time – and then ruining her self-esteem by going off every one of them before a week is up. Well usually, to be more honest, before the first day is up. Or even less than that.

So what if she gains another pound or two between now and January 1? She’s 223 as it is, and at two pounds a week that’s fifty-one weeks of losing weight to get to where she wants to be. What difference will it make if she ends up facing another week or two? None. It’s going to take a year or more, no matter how you look at it. A huge amount of time.

Not that she’s not going to do it. She is. Starting January 1. She just needs a little rest-up first. A breather – a bit of time to draw some breath. Christmas is too hard anyway. Even normal people eat too much at Christmas.

In the meantime, she isn’t going to suffer. She’s earned a holiday from deprivation. “Overstock” has become her creed and motto. She refuses to be stranded ever again with no willpower and no food. Ever. As of the first she’ll have the willpower, and for now she’ll have the food. These days when she gets the Plymouth for an hour she zooms straight over to the shopping centre, leaves the car ticking away its warmth while she hustles through the drug store, grocery store, liquor store, hard- and house-ware stores – pre-drafted lists in hand – topping up supplies of the necessary and the might-be-necessary. She’s gone mad with freedom: secreted boxes of Wagon Wheels and Oreo cookies on rafters in the laundry room and in the storage closet in the basement guest room, hidden candy bars throughout the house, loaded three four-litre tubs of ice cream into the downstairs freezer – one each of chocolate, strawberry and vanilla. (She has a complex explanation ready involving coupons and a Christmas recipe for Neapolitan flambé if anyone should ask about the ice cream. And if Simon or Ida should find her chocolate bars – well, she’ll be amazed.)

So what’s her problem? you may well ask. Well, one of her major problems is that her husband, Graham, used to be married to the most perfect woman in the world – Rosa – but Rosa is, unfortunately, dead, and Rita can never hope to fill her shoes:

Rita stands in the McKittredges’ front vestibule waiting for Noreen and Graham to bring the children from downstairs, where they have fallen asleep on the couch in front of the television set. It is nearly two in the morning and Noreen says they didn’t fall asleep until almost one. “Good as gold,” she said. “Just sat there on the couch, still as little owls, staring at TV.” Rita considers with a sinking feeling what they’ll be like tomorrow after sitting still as owls for seven hours and then not getting enough sleep.

Graham and Noreen have been downstairs for quite a while. The house is still; maybe they’re talking about Elmer. Harry must have gone to bed, or maybe he passed out down there watching TV with the kids.

Rita looks through the living room and into the dining room, and thinks that Simon and Ida must have liked to come here once: this house is so much warmer and more welcoming than Elmer and Coralea’s place, where they like going very well, and so much nicer and more spacious than their own home. The living room is softly lit by a gold-footed floor lamp that stands beside the couch, its cream-coloured shade trimmed in elegant long fringes. The overstuffed body of the couch itself is covered in a dark green velvety fabric, and a multi-coloured afghan made of bright granny squares is draped across the S of its wood-framed back. Rita feels her eyes grow heavy as she imagines herself sinking down across those seat cushions, drawing the afghan up. She imagines the soundness of the sleep that would immediately come over her, the way the tock-tocking of the grandfather clock in the dining room would keep her down, down in the plaited darkness.

In this light, the thread-bareness of the house disappears and the living and dining rooms seem richly flocked and shadowed, battened in browns and blacks, dark greens and golds and reds. At the top of the carpeted stairway, with its square newel posts and dark broad rails, wood deeply shone by all the hands that have run over them for decades, the hallway is in darkness. Even that darkness seems soft to her, appealing.

She straightens, forces her gaze to move around the room in order to keep her eyes open. Her shoulders, arms and legs ache with weariness.

Rita imagines coming home at night to this, when everyone else is in bed. Imagines that Noreen’s left the light on, just as it is right now, set it low after checking the clasps on the windows, locking the doors, going upstairs to join her husband. Or maybe it’s him that does the last jobs, Harry – not the drinker he is today. Maybe Noreen’s already gone up there and readied herself for bed, and now she is settled under their duvet reading a hardcover by the light of her bedside lamp.

Down here, their young, still unmarried daughter opens the door on these familiar rooms cast in their muted light, smells the faint lingering aftersmell of the day’s baking and the evening’s dinner, hears the slow even tock-tock-tocking of the grandfather clock. Rosa steps inside and closes the door behind her, closes herself inside. Others have worked to preserve this place for her while she’s been gone; they’ve made it safe for her. This is where she comes for restoration – for food, for rest, for solitude. She hasn’t needed to think about it, doesn’t need to think about it now—she can take it all for granted. She hangs up her coat and heads for the stairs, her only inclination to go to bed, to sleep. The voyageur is home.

Growing up in a place like this, Rita thinks with envy, would make perfection possible.

It’s not Rosa’s fault, of course – how can anything be her fault when she is dead? – but Rita’s envy of Rosa, combined with a lot of other issues, have helped turn her overeating problem into a full-fledged food addiction.

You can read Rita’s story and the story of how she finally gets a grip on it in the The Whole Clove Diet, a novel, which is available in paperback or in ebook format. (Check out the reviews while you are there – and if you read the book, and especially if you like it, please post a review. Thank you!

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Filed under Addiction, Dieting, Dietinig, Eating Disorders, Excerpt, Habits, health, Healthy Living, The Whole Clove Diet: A Novel, Weight loss

Nine weeks without sugar: Down 20 lbs & counting

LATEST STATS

Amount lost (to Aug 22): 20 lbs

How long it’s taken me  (to August 22): 9 weeks

Amount spent on diet books, diet programs, diet clubs: $0. Zero. Nada. Nothing. Zilch.

My Story So Far

The last week in June I stopped eating sugar — by which I mean all sugars aside from the sugar that occurs naturally in raw fruits, vegetables, a few other foods, and in trace amounts in the whole grain products like bread and crackers (which I don’t eat too much of). I also cut out sweeteners — my thinking being that if I didn’t get rid of “fake” sugar, I’d never get over sugar.

I treated it like quitting an addiction. The first few days were very hard. As I had done when I quit smoking fourteen years ago (which was when I started adding on the pounds), I took a page of graph paper, and I marked off a grid 7 squares by 24 squares to represent one week. Each time I made it through an hour, I shaded in a square with pencil. My goal was to make it through just ONE month of sugar-less eating, to see what would happen. After the first month I decided to go for two months. I’m now heading for the goal of three months.

It was easier to stick to my resolve because I did not set out to lose weight (although of course I hoped that would be a side-benefit). I set out to cut out sugar for health reasons, just to see what would happen, and I only set out to cut it out for one month. So I was counting days rather than calories or pounds lost. When I had a weight-loss plateau, which I did at one point, it  didn’t matter because I was doing this to eliminate the sugar, not the weight. To see if I could make it for a month.

When I went on this program, I was the heaviest I have ever been in my life, and forty pounds heavier than that. Over the past ten years, I had become utterly demoralized by the fact that I had written a novel that I thought was great, I loved it, but I couldn’t sell it. It was my third novel. The first had been published by smaller presses and had done really well, and I wanted a larger publisher this time. I felt the book deserved it. But I had been rejected by nearly 100 publishers and agents.

The book is called The Whole Clove Diet but it is NOT A DIET BOOK, and  nobody needs to read it to do what I have doneThe Whole Clove Diet is a story about one woman, Rita Turner, and if anything it is how she got her head in the right place to be able to start to eat healthy foods — and then inadvertently lost weight. Which is what I did too, but in a different way, eating different foods, and for different reasons.

I had a lot of personal stresses during those ten years, but the worst part was that I did not feel like a writer any more because I had no readers. All my books were out of print. I had written what I thought was a great NEW book, and no one would even read it! (About three agents/editors out of the 100 rejections even wanted to look at the first page). I’d disappeared completely off the literary landscape. I felt like I was a has-been. I turned 60. My only successes were ten years behind me and they included quitting smoking and publishing three works of fiction. (Well, I’d also raised two fine sons, but that’s beside the point in this story — they have their own lives now, thank heavens.)

My arthritis got worse and worse and as my weight increased, it became harder to get out and do things. I stopped running. I avoided going for walks. I was so lacking in confidence about who I was (a writer! I am a writer!) that I lost track of my core strengths, my hope, and my zest. By this spring, I was walking like an old lady because I had a Morton’s neuroma in one foot and a sore hip. All my joints were painful.

Two years ago I had watched Robert H. Lustig’s amazing video, Sugar: The Bitter Truth. Lustig is a professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology at the University of California San Francisco, and he explores the damage that is caused to our bodies by sugary foods. He calls it a “poison.” He says that it is “toxic.” He has all the scientific studies  you could want to back up his assertions: track them back to their sources. You can check them out for yourself. I was blown away by this video, and sent the link to almost everyone I knew.

I had been reading more and more information over the years about the bad effects of refined sugar (e.g. this article entitled “Cancer cells slurp up sugar“) and I knew that every additional M & M I ate was adding to my current and potential health problems. As I became officially “obese,” I increased my risk of diabetes and Alzheimer’s and a bunch of other diseases I didn’t want. And it got harder and harder to walk, and more and more difficult to open jars with my arthritic fingers. My clothes got tighter. I was getting older before my very eyes. Miserable, depressed, I ate another bowl of ice cream.

By now the literary landscape from which I’d disappeared had changed, so (given my extensive background in publishing and editing) I decided to take the plunge and self-publish The Whole Clove Diet — if for no other reason than to get it off my desk so that I could write my next novel.

And as so often happens in this creative business, things did not go the way the rejecting agents and publishers had thought, and I am now hopeful that some day I will be able to tell them, “I told you so.” (I have kept their email addresses for this very reason.) So far, readers seem to like my book a lot and it’s also received some great critical acclaim and even an award.

With a new book out, even a self-published one (although now I am totally won over to  self-publishing and am happy this book didn’t have a traditional publisher: my next novel won’t, either. I co-authored it with another writer. It’s a rollicking western based on the story of Don Quixote, and it’ll be out in a few months) I started to feel like my old self again, and I was able to start looking at my mobility difficulties as issues that could be addressed if I set my mind to it. I started to look forward to the future (my NEXT books. I can’t wait to write them! — I have always felt this way until the last few years when the feeling had gone away, and I’d been afraid I’d never write another. But it’s back. I am so happy.)

For the same reasons that I’d wanted to quit smoking for  twenty years before I did it — which was to be healthy so I could write, travel, read, visit and inhale the smells of the world for as many more years as I could — I was ready to get healthy. And based on viewing Lustig’s video, and reading Ray Kurzweil and Terry Grossman’s books (yes: I admit it. I do want to live forever. And be healthy while I’m doing it), and reading the science that is behind a lot of other diets (including most notably The Zone, which I find a good model to follow, but anything healthy will do), I decided to stop eating sugar. And to wean myself from sweets.

My first goal was to reduce the swelling in my fingers and toes and knees — and it’s happened!  I am in SO much less pain than I was two months ago, I can’t believe it. The weight loss has helped with the knees and toes, I guess, but the fingers!! WoW! Yeah! Hand me that jar of pickles! That had to be the sugar. My chiropractor (Dr. Evelyn Bak, owner and founder of the Balance Health Group in Toronto. She’s a genius plus I actually DID the exercises she gave me) has started to make a difference to muscle problems in the hip region that are several decades old, and the neuroma is almost gone.

I also have about 100 times more energy (no afternoon slumps!) than I did when I was shoving candy, ice cream and baked goods in my face. And that helps my self-confidence too.

So I’m back. And I’m telling you this because YOU DON’T need to spend ANY MONEY to start losing the weight and getting healthier. You can just stop eating sugar. If you need a support network, go on to one of the weight-loss forums like diet.com that is free and isn’t connected to any particular group (we can even start a No Sugar group over there if someone wants to do that).

And if you need a reason, watch Lustig. He has a bunch of shorter videos out now too. They’re free. And they will give you all the reason in the world to stop eating sugar even if you don’t need to lose weight. It’s a killer. All I’ve done is stopped poisoning myself.

I am hoping to make this a way of life. It’s not a diet. I eat almost anything that doesn’t have sugar added to it.

I am still less than half way to the shape I want to be — and I want to be that shape because it’s healthy, not because it’s “hot.” I’m already hot–that part’s in my head. 🙂

I’ll keep you posted.

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Filed under Addiction, Habits, health, No Sugar, No sweeteners, Sugar, The Whole Clove Diet: A Novel, Weight loss